Responsible Research and Innovation: what really is it? what to write?

The Marie Curie Alumni Association, in collaboration with EuroScientist, hosted a round table on “Responsible Research and Innovation: a check-up” on March  2018. The full event was recorded and is available here.

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) has become a buzzword in European science in the last few years. Scientists must fill in the RRI section in their European project, and sometimes they do not know what to write there. Others are anxious to have the RRI tag attached to their communication and PR activities. But what really is RRI? Why is it needed? How could science and society benefit from this approach? The strict definition of RRI implies a radical change in the way of conceiving scientific projects from the very beginning, bringing a wide range of stakeholders (from companies to activists, from designers to patients…) in defining the scientific agenda. Are researchers prepared for that? What is the actual level of implementation of RRI in European science? What policies are there in place to facilitate this process?

Making science count in policy making

Representatives of the most important stakeholders participated in the round table:

  • Rosina Malagrida, La Caixa Foundation, RRI Tools project
  • Gerrit Rauws, Director at King Baudouin Foundation
  • Anne Loeber, NewHoRRIzon consortium

The round table is moderated by Dr. Michele Catanzaro (physicist, freelance science journalist for Nature, El Periódico, and other outlets).

This is a free on-line (only) event organized by the Marie Curie Alumni Association, in collaboration with EuroScientist.

Becas para realizar estancias de investigación en el extranjero

La Fundación Ramón Areces y la Fundación Alfonso Martín Escudero abren sus convocatorias de movilidad internacional para investigadores.

Fundación Ramón Areces (plazo de solicitud hasta el 5 de abril de 2018)

Ampliación de Estudios en el Extranjero en Ciencias de la Vida y de la Materia

La Fundación Ramón Areces tiene como objetivo fundamental el patrocinio de proyectos de investigación científica y técnica en España a través de Concursos Nacionales, la formación de jóvenes investigadores, así como el fomento y desarrollo de la educación y de la cultura en general.

En línea con estos objetivos, la Fundación adjudicará veintidós Becas a doctores jóvenes para que amplíen sus estudios en universidades y centros de investigación en el extranjero durante el curso académico 2018/2019.

La convocatoria del presente año está orientada hacia los campos de:

  • Biomedicina
  • Química
  • Física y Materiales
  • Preservación de la Biosfera

La dotación económica de cada beca es de 2.200 euros mensuales durante un año, prorrogable por un segundo año, previo informe del Consejo Científico de la Fundación. Además, la Fundación se hace cargo de los gastos de viaje (ida y vuelta) y de un seguro de enfermedad y accidentes.

La convocatoria está abierta hasta el día 5 de abril de 2018.

Para más información sobre las solicitudes y los requisitos acudir a la web del programa.

Fundación Alfonso Martín Escudero  (plazo de solicitud hasta el 27 de abril de 2018)

Becas de investigación en universidades o centros en el extranjero

Fundación Alfonso Martín Escudero convoca 60 becas cuyo objetivo es realizar trabajos de investigación en universidades o centros de investigación en el extranjero, en temas que estén comprendidos en alguna de las siguientes áreas:

  • Agricultura y ganadería
  • Ciencias del mar
  • Ciencias de la salud
  • Tecnología de alimentos

En este caso, la dotación de la beca incluye:

  • Ayuda para traslados e instalación por un importe total de 3.100 euros.
  • Seguro de enfermedad y accidentes suscrito por la Fundación Alfonso Martín Escudero y en su caso, el exigido por el centro extranjero.
  • Asignación mensual entre 1.900 y 3.000 euros, según el país de destino.

Las solicitudes se pueden realizar de forma presencial y online hasta el día 27 de abril de 2018.

Más información sobre estas ayudas en la web de la convocatoria.

Start to get credit for reviewing manuscripts/abstracts now!

Publons is a new platform that recognizes the reviews that the researchers perform for journals or conferences and discusses the latest research in their field. Anyone can create an account there and start receiving credit for a peer review that s/he has reviewed by simply forwarding the acknowledgment email s/he received from the journal/conference secretariat on to reviews@publons.com.

Publons rewards you for documenting your review history by providing you with a verified record which you can use in funding and promotion applications.

You can read more about Publons as well as other methods of adding reviews here.

Career Workshop 2017

15 PhD positions on the Resource Recovery

The EU Horizon 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie MSCA-ETN Project NEW-MINE (Resource Recovery Through Enhanced Landfill Mining) is looking for candidates to conduct funded PhDs on the Resource Recovery Through Enhanced Landfill Mining. The project lies on a consortium of high profile universities, research institutions and companies located in Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Sweden, Italy and UK.

Information and applications can be found in the website of new-mine.

How to build the visibility of your work and manage your reputation

Nowadays, it is important to create awareness of or share materials relating to your work. The global shift towards making research findings available free of charge for readers, so-called ‘Open access’, has been a core strategy in the European Commission to improve knowledge circulation and thus innovation. It is illustrated in particular by the general principle for open access to scientific publications in Horizon 2020 and the pilot for research data.

Ways to aware and share your work vary from conversations with colleagues to multimedia sharing sites (e.g., Slideshare or YouTube). Other strategies include:

  • Social networking sites (e.g., LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook)
  • Discussion lists
  • Academic networking and profile sites (Table 1).
  • Subject-based websites and repositories (e.g., arXiv, SSRN)
  • Your own blog and website
  • Posts on other blogs and websites
  • Conferences and meetings
  • Institutional websites and repositories

Figure from http://redrisestudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10

 

Table 1. Academic networking and profile sites.

ResearchGate
ResearcherID
Mendeley
Academia.edu
Google Scholar
ImpactStory
Elsevier’s “My Research Dashboard”
Loop
Kudos
ORCID

The benefits of using academic network and creating profiles in such webpages (Table 1) are numerous. You can discover relevant publications, share links to your/other publications, discuss and comment on relevant research, find jobs, find collaborators, find applicants for a project proposal, track metrics relating to research performance, help people find and contact you, find and contact other people, post files such as your publications or other research outputs… In general, these web-design platforms allow you to assemble and create information help search filtering, share information to drive discovery, and measure and monitor the effect of these activities.

Tools for improving both the visibility of your work and your reputation are listed below:

  • Presenting at conferences
  • Blogging
  • Communicating via social media
  • Consultancy
  • Industry engagement
  • Teaching
  • Winning funding / grants
  • Winning awards / prizes
  • Community contribution (e.g. activities for a professional body)
  • Editorship
  • Publication
  • Peer-reviewing
  • Commercializing your research / registering your designs / patents
  • Collaboration
  • Mentoring
  • Engaging with the media
  • Community contribution (e.g. activities for a professional body)

In addition, Kudos (a web-based service for researchers that aims to help them and their institutions to maximize the visibility and impact of their published articles) is undertaking a survey to learn about researchers’ behaviour, experiences and expectations in relation to building the visibility of their work, and managing their reputation. Results from this survey will be presented at forthcoming conferences (including UKSG and FORCE 16) and on Kudos’ blog in due course. Any researcher can complete the survey here and will enter a prize draw for an online shopping voucher of £100.

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Video Journals

In a world that the rate of technological and social change accelerates frighteningly, change itself often seems to be the only constant. The time has come and gone where the papers acquisitions can be based solely on printed copies, due to the online-publication. First the pdf-files appear, followed by the posterior audioslides. Now a new approach has arrived based on videos: you submit the manuscript, and the journal produce the video.

This is the case of JoVE. JoVe publishes scientific methods video articles that are peer-reviewed, PubMed-indexed, and being cited in many top journals including Nature, Science and Cell. This new video-journal has received its first Impact Factor–1.325–indexed in the 2015 Journal Citation Reports. JoVE includes:

  • 80 new video articles published every month
  • 4,000+ video articles with 16,000+ authors published since 2006
  • 900+ subscribing institutions
  • 6,000,000+ users per year
  • Video production conducted by JoVE filming crews in 20 countries around the world

Examples of JoVE video articles from labs at MIT, HarvardYale, Stanford, Princeton and Caltech can show leading scientists communicate their research in the most innovative format.

As a result, universities are acquiring usage rights to JoVE (video)articles, e.g. the Univiersity of Arkansas Libraries. Technology has been a force in the development of civilization, all the more so as its link with science has been forged. In the broadest sense, video-papers could extend our abilities to change the world: to cut, shape, or put together ideas; to move things from one place to another; to reach farther with our hands, voices, and senses. Are you ready to be the actor/actress of your dreams?

UNEP internships

 
Students from a wide range of disciplines are able to apply, and depending on qualifications, are selected for internships that relate either to the organization’s strategic activities or to administrative or technical functions. Internships afford you the opportunity to work in a multi-cultural international organization.
Requirements
  • The applicant MUST be in his/her third or fourth year of under-graduate (BA/BSc.) or in a graduate (Masters) or post-graduate (PhD) programme, and must continue to be enrolled during the period of the internship and after.
  • Willingness to intern on a full-time basis spending five days a week for a period of not less than THREE MONTHS and not exceeding SIX MONTHS.
  • Send a letter of endorsement from his/her educational institution, attesting to the fact that he/she is currently a registered student and will continue to be enrolled for the envisaged period of the internship. A letter from any one of the following personnel is suggested:
    • Dean of Students or Dean of Faculty
    • Registrar
    • Placement Office
  • Fluency in English is mandatory; knowledge of any other UN language (French or Spanish) is an advantage
http://www.unep.org/vacancies/default.asp?vac_level=Interns

What to do when you don’t know what studies to choose

Have you ever, or are you asking yourself about what studies you should choose from the millions that are offered in the World? Below you can find some tips that may help you get started, clarify concepts and reduce uncertainties.

1. Whenever you can, visit the centres, “spy” the people and infrastructures around, develop the situational awareness.

2. Ask for information and request an appointment with the organizers or tutors of the courses. Prepare these meetings in advance with all the questions that come into your mind focusing on finding out more about, not only the programmes, but also the lecturers. Go to the information sessions and the education fairs. Do not believe the myths, only the facts. Read carefully all the courses details in the curricula, webpages, leaflets and any document that you have compiled.

3. Analyze pros and cons for each course and give special weigh to both: those topics that you most like and the work opportunities that you have more chance of obtaining. It simply means letting go and being yourself, being free to trust your instinct and follow your passions. Life is too short and hard to do things that you do not love or that you cannot make a living from them.

4. It can be importat to include the Environment aspects in the previous point: public transportation, cost of living, support networks and workmates, distance from home-land, gender distribution, accommodation, countryside, communication, cultural shock, climate, friends, local industries. In fact, you can do this research during the first item above.

5. If you are confused, think about your friends and talk to people that have passed through the same some time ago. Again, do not believe the myths.

6. Still in doubt? Make a spreadsheet, fill it with a quantitative scale and the highest score could be your answer.


Did you like it? Which one did you like the most? Do you dis-/agree? Would you add anything else? Would you change or comment any of those points? You can comment just here.

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