Scientific consensus on climate for years, but have things changed at all?

The image below belongs to the presentation of Lewandowsky during the EU4facts (Brussels, 2017):

Still the last warning by scientists was made on the 5th of November 2019 in an article from William J Ripple and colleagues, published by BioSciencehttps://academic.oup.com/bioscience/advance-article/doi/10.1093/biosci/biz088/5610806

Why have not things changed despite the warnings in the last 20 years? What can we do to get politicians into action? What can be done? go on strike? even if it is only for one day?

In case you would like to start helping the conservation of nature and improving our quality of life, see some simple advice (David Suzuki Foundation):

1.Reduce home energy use by 10%·         

2.Choose energy-efficient homes & appliances·         

3.Don’t use pesticides·         

4.Eat meat-free meals one day a week·         

5.Buy locally grown and produced food·        

6.Choose a fuel-efficient vehicle·         

7.Walk, bike, carpool or take transit·        

8.Choose a home close to work or school·         

9.Support alternative transportation

Looking after your self-ie: A guide to finding your balance on and offline

It was launched a free online e-learning resource Looking after your self-ie. The e-learning resource aims to help all social media users build a meaningful, more balanced relationship with platforms where use is conscious and mindful, and the user is in control.

The programme explores a range of different issues including social media’s impact on loneliness, relationships, self-image, self-esteem, sleep, online trolling and bullying.
They are also encouraging all users to share photos of themselves participating in acts of self-care with the hashtag #LookingAfterYourSelfie
Access the e-learning

Turning ‘failure’ into success, and ‘boredom’ into innovation

Failed and Bored” is the upcoming conference organized by the Marie Curie Alumni Association (MCAA). The conference provides a positive perspective on failure and boredom in science and business. This conference draws on MCAA fellows success stories and literary anecdotes to explain the importance of failure & ordinary subjects in research, the advantages of embracing it and the power of leveraging your mistakes to stimulate personal growth. It targets researchers, entrepreneurs, and startups and is free of charge for all MCAA members.

Date: 28 September 2019
Time: 9.00h – 21.00h CET
Venue: University of Innsbruck, Austria

Find more info and register here.

Pint of Science 2019

Monday 20 May to Wednesday 22 May 

Pint of Science is an annual festival that takes place over three evenings in multiple cities around the world.

The aim is to present fun, interesting and relevant talks and activities based on the latest science research in an accessible format to the public, in a pub setting. For that, researchers prepare fun and engaging talks and demonstrations aimed at a non-specialist, general public audience and based on their real research. 

In Sheffield, topics like Have we got time to waste?, Sound and vision and The future of healthcare, among others, will be represented.

Retractionwatch: an indispensable tool in scholarly publishing

Since August 2010, there is a place for recording  studies no longer reliable. The blog retractionwatch.com created the first database of retractions, with nearly 18,000 retractions so far, stretching back decades. There are well over a thousand retractions each year and this database inform about scientific misconducts.

Retractionwatch is doing deeper dives, prompting to file public records requests for reports of misconduct investigations and other materials (and their co-founders to urge universities to do a better job with them). In the past year, retractionwatch has collaborated together with journalism organizations, to bring readers stories that go deep and reach larger audiences than retractionwatch can on the blog. There are their established partnerships with STAT and Science, where they continue to break news and help readers make sense of developments.

Some of the most impressive stories related to retractions and academic misconduct include:

Can you share yours in the comments below?

This non-profit organization have received some foundation support from MacArthur Foundation, the Helmsley Trust, and the Arnold Foundation. The founders, Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus, are not taking salaries from the organization. One can contribute with a tax-deductible donation to The Center For Scientific Integrity or contribution, follow them on Twitter, like them on Facebook, add them to your RSS reader, sign up for an email or subscribe to daily digest. If you find a retraction that’s not in their database, you can let them know here. For comments or feedback: team@retractionwatch.com.

Pseudo science and bias information

Fake news is everywhere. Science-related pseudo facts have taken over the gossip sites and social media. And we are only at the beginning of an uphill battle to set the record straight. In this contribution, Melissa Hoover, shares her investigation on how people’s response to fake news makes it easier for such inaccurate stories to propagate at a rate that is way more important than fact-based news. Continue reading here.