Responsible Research and Innovation: what really is it? what to write?

The Marie Curie Alumni Association, in collaboration with EuroScientist, hosted a round table on “Responsible Research and Innovation: a check-up” on March  2018. The full event was recorded and is available here.

Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) has become a buzzword in European science in the last few years. Scientists must fill in the RRI section in their European project, and sometimes they do not know what to write there. Others are anxious to have the RRI tag attached to their communication and PR activities. But what really is RRI? Why is it needed? How could science and society benefit from this approach? The strict definition of RRI implies a radical change in the way of conceiving scientific projects from the very beginning, bringing a wide range of stakeholders (from companies to activists, from designers to patients…) in defining the scientific agenda. Are researchers prepared for that? What is the actual level of implementation of RRI in European science? What policies are there in place to facilitate this process?

Making science count in policy making

Representatives of the most important stakeholders participated in the round table:

  • Rosina Malagrida, La Caixa Foundation, RRI Tools project
  • Gerrit Rauws, Director at King Baudouin Foundation
  • Anne Loeber, NewHoRRIzon consortium

The round table is moderated by Dr. Michele Catanzaro (physicist, freelance science journalist for Nature, El Periódico, and other outlets).

This is a free on-line (only) event organized by the Marie Curie Alumni Association, in collaboration with EuroScientist.

Retractionwatch: an indispensable tool in scholarly publishing

Since August 2010, there is a place for recording  studies no longer reliable. The blog retractionwatch.com created the first database of retractions, with nearly 18,000 retractions so far, stretching back decades. There are well over a thousand retractions each year and this database inform about scientific misconducts.

Retractionwatch is doing deeper dives, prompting to file public records requests for reports of misconduct investigations and other materials (and their co-founders to urge universities to do a better job with them). In the past year, retractionwatch has collaborated together with journalism organizations, to bring readers stories that go deep and reach larger audiences than retractionwatch can on the blog. There are their established partnerships with STAT and Science, where they continue to break news and help readers make sense of developments.

Some of the most impressive stories related to retractions and academic misconduct include:

Can you share yours in the comments below?

This non-profit organization have received some foundation support from MacArthur Foundation, the Helmsley Trust, and the Arnold Foundation. The founders, Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus, are not taking salaries from the organization. One can contribute with a tax-deductible donation to The Center For Scientific Integrity or contribution, follow them on Twitter, like them on Facebook, add them to your RSS reader, sign up for an email or subscribe to daily digest. If you find a retraction that’s not in their database, you can let them know here. For comments or feedback: team@retractionwatch.com.

“Hydrogeoday” 10 March, Coruña 2018

This Saturday 10th of March, the Asociación Española de Hidrogeólogos (Spanish Association of Hydrogeologists) organizes the “Hydrogeoday”, a scientific dissemination workshop in hydrogeology, that will take place in Galicia, under the direction of the research group “Agua y Suelo – AQUASOL” (Water and soil), belonging to CICA (Centro de Investigaciones Científicas Avanzadas) from the Universidade da Coruña

Poster of the Hydrogeoday workshop.

More info: http://www.aih-ge.org/

The focus will be in good practices for quality groundwater collection from small water supplies, which are quite abundant in rural areas.

The workshop is open to all kind of people and is free of charge. But places are limited and is necessary to enroll in advance via e-mail.

09:45 bus from A Coruña center, to Escuela de Caminos and later on to Abegondo townhall.

Pseudo science and bias information

Fake news is everywhere. Science-related pseudo facts have taken over the gossip sites and social media. And we are only at the beginning of an uphill battle to set the record straight. In this contribution, Melissa Hoover, shares her investigation on how people’s response to fake news makes it easier for such inaccurate stories to propagate at a rate that is way more important than fact-based news. Continue reading here.

Webinar of the Science Policy series: What does “open science” really mean?

On 3rd October 2017, 13:30 CET

“Open science”: never has a term been interpreted in so many different ways. The diversity of perspectives may reflect the paradigm shift in how science is done, which is encoded in these words. ‘Open science’ encompasses open access to journals, sharing of scientific data, easy reproducibility, and transparency in research evaluation, among many other aspects. Future perspectives include the “uberisation” of science, and the harnessing of social networks mechanisms in research. In this webinar, we will rely on important actors in the process of opening science to put order among these ideas. We will try to understand where academia is going, and how to engage more scholars in open science.

Making science count in policy making

The Marie Curie Alumni Association, in collaboration with EuroScientist, will be hosting a round-table with the participation of representatives of the most important stakeholders :

  • Julie Sainz, Policy Officer at the European Commission, Unit C.2 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions
  • Ivo Grigorov, marine science researcher and member of the FOSTER project to promote open science education among researchers
  • Eva Méndez, professor of Information Science and member of the EC’s Open Science Policy Platform
  • Sascha Friesike, researcher at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, focus on how technology can help in opening science and the role it can play in creative processes

The round table will be moderated by Dr. Michele Catanzaro (physicist, freelance science journalist for Nature, El Periódico, and other outlets).

The event is free but registration is required HERE.